Saturday, February 11, 2017

Tree Falling 20170122 at Victorian





Here is the last few seconds of a Facebook Live video I was shooting when a huge limb fell off of this Ash tree and hit a building. What are the odds of this happening? Crazy.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

44th F100 Truck Show in Morro Bay

This last Saturday, 8/16/2014, I took a jaunt to Morro Bay to see what the 44th Annual F 100 North-South Run Was all about. I arrived early to beat any crowds.

The show was to start at 8 am, so I arrived at Tidelands Park around 6 am. I walked around and took some photos of the birds and the local "Morro Bay" scenery while I waited for the event.

The trucks started showing up around 7:45 am. After about an hour, the park was full of early Ford F-100 trucks and vans. The pride of ownership and the time and money invested in these early to late 50's trucks was obvious. I have seen a lot of Ford trucks, (having been a Ford truck owner since I first started driving back in the 60's), but there were some models I hadn't seen before.

I walked around, took photos and talked with the owners until mid morning. This was a fun little excursion on a Saturday morning, and one of the reasons I love living on the central coast.

For information on this event or other F-100 events go to: www.f100elite.com .

Sunday, June 3, 2012

Photo Processing Choices

B-24 over San Luis Obispo, Ca.

As a photographer, when I create an image, I generally have a purpose in mind for the final processing of that image. As a Photo-Artist, I like to play with the image during processing to see what my possibilities are.

To me, all the processing programs available are like a painters tool palette. Sometimes I know the effect I want and use the proper tool to achieve the effect. Other times I push the boundaries of the tools and see what happens. The more I explore, the more I learn about the tools. I also can see what happens by combining effects with each other. The 4 photos above are an example of playing with a programs sliders. I used a combination of black and white along with color to create the different versions of the photo. by masking and blending layers in photoshop I could darken the plane or sky and change the tones. By using different effects in Topaz tools I could change the sharpness, grain, etc. and mix it in Photoshop.

The 4 versions above, are just a sample of the effects I was able to come up with for this photo. I didn't want to bore anyone with the other 20+ versions.

The point is EXPERIMENT. You have nothing to loose, and lots of information to gain. Remember to make note when things turn out to your liking. It is like a recipe for a good cake. Once you have it, make a preset and put notes as to what it does, for future reference.

Happy Processing...

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Kelby Photo Walk...

I am looking forward to joining my fellow photographers and friends this weekend, for the Kelby Photo Walk. I will be joining our walk leader Howard Ignatius, in Morro Bay, CA for the local photo walk. Should be many great subjects. This is happening the same day as the Morro Bay Harbor Festival.

I will post some photos after the event.  Have a great weekend.

Saturday, June 11, 2011

Upcoming Gallery Exhibit

Everyone is invited to the "Artist Reception" featuring my latest work, on June 24th at the Epic Light Gallery in Los Osos, CA. The reception will be from 6-8pm and will feature the music of musician Matt Kuster. (For those who don't know, Matt is my step-son.)

I will be displaying works done on metallic paper, glossy, matte and canvas. The photos include, High Dynamic Range images and local area photography.

I hope you can come and see my images in print. Other local artists are displayed at the gallery, including Kevin Cole, Bob Canepa, Amanda Valena, Becky Sloat, Hal Schmitt and Victoria Schmitt

Saturday, January 29, 2011

HDR Workshop with Hal Schmitt

Photo taken during Hal Schmitt's HDR Workshop.
This last Thursday and Friday, (1/27 and 1/28, 2011), I had the opportunity to take Hal Schmitt's workshop, "Photographing and Processing HDR Intensive", through Light Photographic Workshops in Los Osos, CA.

I first met Hal during the Kelby Photo Walk in August of 2010. Light Workshops had sponsored the walk in San Luis Obispo, near the Old Mission, and had noted in their information that this would be a good place for shooting HDR (High Dynamic Range) Photography. I wasn't familiar with Hal, or the Photography school that he and his wife, Victoria own. I knew of the school when it belonged to George Lepp, but had never attended any of the workshops or classes.

While attending the Kelby Photowalk, I had quizzed Hal on some of the techniques he used for shooting HDR. Hal was forthright with his techniques for determining the proper capture of images for HDR. I knew by his approach and the way he could explain the process of shooting HDR, that if I ever was to take a workshop, he would be the instructor I would choose.

I had signed up for the California Photo Festival, sponsored by Light Workshops and had a great week of learning and photographing the Central Coast. However, I did not get the opportunity to take one of Hal's workshops. I did however take workshops and classes by a few of the well known instructors that were at the workshop. Hanson Fong, Rick Sammon, Jane Conner-Ziser and Jim DiVitale, were just a few of the instructors that I was able to learn from during the California Photo Fest. I learned much and have been able to take my photo processing skills to new personal levels.

So, last week, the opportunity came up to take Hal's HDR Intensive, and I decided to do so. I can tell you, this was one of the most informative photographic workshops I have ever taken, and I have taken many in past years by some of the worlds best photographers. What you may not know about me is that I am an information addict. I am that guy that reads instruction manuals for fun! In my construction business, people will call me to install products that no one else wants to install, because of the technical issues involved. I LOVE those challenges. So over the years I have not only taken many classes and workshops, but have taught a few also. So when I signed up for Hal's workshop, I thought I would pick up a few good tidbits to add to what I had already learned about HDR, through books by Trey Ratcliff, Rick Sammon, David Nightingale and others.

I have to say I was completely impressed by the information, and the structure, by which Hal instructed for the 2 days. After the 2 days I had learned more about HDR and the processing of HDR images, using Photomatix Pro, Photoshop and other programs, than from all the other information I had gathered prior to the workshop. Hal took us through the complete procedure for capturing the images to using the right programs for processing the images for the desired effect. He showed us numerous "tricks and shortcuts" to help us with our HDR processing. Hal is one of the BEST instructors I have ever had. He knows his information, and better yet knows how to deliver it in a precise and direct manner, building a solid structure of information for the listener with a great foundation.

Victoria, Hal and Becky from the Light Photographic Workshops, are great to work with, and full of valuable information when it comes to anything photographic. I look forward to my next 'outing' with them.

Saturday, December 4, 2010

The Grapes photo process...

I've been asked by a couple of people, how I processed my photo of the grapes I posted on flickr. So I will give a quick overview of what I did.
I started with 3 photos (as shown in the photo below). I shot the grapes as an HDR using 0, -2 and +2 Exposure values. I then tonemapped the 3 photos in Photomatix Pro and blended until I got the photo below marked 'Tonemapped Tif'.
After tonemapping the photo, I opened it in Lightroom 3. There I did a little tweaking in the 'Basic' section of the Develop module. I adjusted the photo with - fill light, highlight recovery, black clipping, contrast, temperature, tint, clarity and vibrance. I didn't adjust any of the above by very much. It was like making a stew... I adjusted to taste!
I then opened the lightroom-adjusted photo in Photoshop CS5. I don't like adjusting the sharpness of my photos in lightroom, so the first thing I did was to sharpen the photo on a new layer. (This photo did not have much noise, but if it had, I would have used Topaz DeNoise before I sharpened.)
After sharpening, I used a curves adjustment layer and grabbed the top point of the diagonal adjustment, (highlight side), then pulled it straight down to just below the middle of the scale. This will darken the whole photo without changing the color. Then making sure I was in the adjustment layer mask, I hit B(brush), then D (default colors),then X (switch foreground/backround color), choosing a large brush (1400 - 1600 dpi), with 0% hardness. I then clicked the areas I wanted to highlight with the brush. I have seen this technique used many times, and there are a number of ways to do it. Jim DiVitale shows another way in his Creative Lighting tutorial. (Click on the "Creative Lighting by Jim DiVitale" link.)
So after this, I saved the file and went back to Lightroom 3, and cropped and tilted the photo to my taste.
Simple Huh! Well it wasn't real difficult, but, as all my past photoshop instructors have said... Just play with it. There is no right or wrong way to do this.
Thanks... Dan O.